Using posters to display students’ artwork

As teachers, we’re always looking for ways to display our students’ artwork. They draw, paint and collage a creative mountain in the classroom, and their art deserves a special display! But, more often then not, these treasured pieces end up crumpled in our students’ backpacks. (And, as a parent, these wrinkled masterpieces end up in an art pile, along with some good intentions to hang them in our home. Or, is this just me?!)

So, how do you get a stack of original students’ creations that honours their artwork, and looks good for parents, and is an easy and creative fundraiser?! Have Budding Artists turn your classroom art (or, for parents, your child’s art) into a poster! In this post, we share how to display students’ artwork in a poster, and turn in into a quick and engaging fundraiser for your school.

Poster fundraisers:

Last year, my child’s school celebrated 100 years. As part of the celebrations, each student made a self-portrait. (Learn more about why self-portraits are an awesome art project in this Budding Artists’ blog post.) We scanned in the artwork, and a parent made the class poster. Don’t forget to display the posters so parents can see them and order a print! We used the media centre from our school board to do the printing, and raised $7 per poster. It was an engaging idea to get parents involved, and we quickly raised $600 for our school!

We loved making posters so much that we’re adding this product in our newest program, Artistically Yours (Fall 2017). Check out our posters!

Looking for other ideas that align with curricula? What about using artwork inspired by a book? In this case, we didn’t sell the posters, but I made the poster as a big thank you to our grade 1/2 classroom teacher.

Hanging the poster. A simple frame is always a lovely way to hang a poster. But, we also love the use of washi tape (from your Dollar Store) for an extra colourful and inexpensive way to hang the poster on your child’s bedroom wall.

Budding Artists can create personalized posters. We can do a variety of themes. Call us and ask how we can help preserve your child’s artwork and raise funds at the same time.

 

Mother’s Day Art Ideas

March break has come and gone. We are looking forward to spring and planning our Mother’s Day event. Here is a collection of Mother’s Day art activities you can do with your children. 

PicCollage8

  1. Fork Sunflowers Crafty Morning
  2. Picasso Flowers Mrs. T’s First Grade Class
  3. Mom The Educator’s Spin On It
  4. Monet’s Garden Art Rocks
  5. You are My Sunshine Twin Dragonfly Designs
  6. Paul Klee Portrait Simply Art Lessons for Kids
  7. Dandelions Crafty Morning

 

Create a personalized new piece of artwork or break open the treasure trove of artwork you have preserved neatly. We’d love to see what you do together. Share it on our Facebook page

Orders over $80 receive free shipping! Order by April 25, 2017 for a Mother’s Day delivery. 

Happy spring!

Maria

Commemorate Canada’s 150

Commemoration Tile Wall Buddingartists.ca

Have you thought about how you are going to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday? Why not consider building a Commemoration Tile Wall to mark the year.

With the help of Budding Artists you can make the celebration an easy one whose memory will live on long after 2017. Include everyone at your school or limit it to a single classroom or social group. The choice is yours, but the process is easy however you choose to run it.

Tile Walls

You have a few choices on tiles. Ceramic and Hardboard Tiles (4.25 x 4.25) cost $5, including shipping and handling. Smaller hardboard tiles (2 x 2) cost $3.

Decide whether you want your Tile Wall to be part of a fundraising initiative or the focus of a community event. There are different ways to proceed with the building of your Tile Wall, depending upon your needs.

Fundraiser – Charge more for the tiles ($7-$10). Everything over and above the $5 cost is your profit. If you have parents unable or unwilling to pay for the cost of the tile, but you want to include everyone in the process and final product, factor them in, but reduce your profits accordingly.

One way to raise money to pay for the Tile Wall is to run a Budding Artists Artrageous fundraiser. Everyone creates artwork, which is sent home with an order form. Parents purchase products made from their children’s artwork with a potential profit of 25%, depending upon the cost you set for products.

Community Building – Include everyone in the process, regardless of whether they can afford to buy a tile or not. Charge everyone $5 to cover costs of the tiles or use money from your Parent Council or from other fundraising efforts to pay for the wall. You can ask for families to sponsor extra tiles.

The Process

  1. Decide on a theme for your tile wall. If it is for a Canada 150 celebration, ask everyone to design a tile with that in mind (what does Canada represent to you? what images come to mind when you think about Canada?). Another option is to choose specific colours to unify the look of your wall (perhaps your school colours?). The choices are endless, but make sure to instruct the children on the theme of their tile before designing it.
  2. Who will facilitate the making of the art? Will you have children design their tiles at school or at home? If at school, who will be the one to oversee the process? Make sure instructions are clear to ensure your final product fits with your theme.
  3. How will you display the Tile Wall? Will it be permanently attached or will it have the ability to be moved? Tiles can be directly attached to a wall or placed on a board, making it movable. Make sure you get permission from the administration before installation if you choose to make the display permanent. Who will construct the wall once the tiles are completed? Where will it be located?
  4. Decide on a delivery date. Here is our calendar.
  5. Book online.

 

No matter what you are celebrating this year, an anniversary or special historical event coming up at your school, Budding Artists is here to help.

Make your mark!

Crayon Art

There are so many wonderful ideas using crayons to create memorable art pieces.

The image below is a gift from my self-described “I don’t like art” teenager for Mother’s Day a few years ago.

He used a stencil and spray painted ” Happy Mother’s Day” He glued a set of crayons onto a bristol board and used a hairdryer to melt the crayons.

I love it so much. He planned and executed an art project. Its worth so much more than a box of chocolates.

IMG_8397

A quick search on Pinterest for ‘melted crayon art’ will give you a plethora of ideas. Here are a few ideas. Looking for a crayon resist Father’s Day project, check this out.

il_570xN.262351813http://lindseydanielladidit.blogspot.ca/2011/09/melted-crayon-art.html

 

055-Dot-Art-Buttonhttp://www.piecesbypolly.com/2011/09/melted-crayon-art-and-pointillism-books.html

 

img_0480-e1346114681133http://madisonzanecreations.com/2012/08/27/craft-days-melted-crayon-art/

He(ART) Cards

Christmas has come and gone. If you are like me, the tradition of sending out Christmas cards with a personalized Christmas letter has gone by the wayside. I suppose I have become more lax, what with the ease of keeping in touch via Facebook and other social media outlets. Really though, who doesn’t like to receive a real letter in the mail?

So why not start a new tradition? Winter is the perfect time to create your own love cards. This February, send homemade he(art cards). Budding Artists makes it easy.

For the month of February, send us your artwork and make your own he(art) cards. Spend some quality time together to create art with your child. Come up with a meaningful message from both of you to insert into the card. Bring back handwriting and enjoy time with your family—creating and writing! Your friends and family will be touched by your thoughtfulness.

Talking to Kids about Art

Anyone that has ever stepped into a home that includes children has certainly seen a fridge full of art covered in colourful blobs, scribbled designs, and creative messes. What you may or may not be able to figure out is what those pictures represent. Is it a tree, cat or picture of you? Or is it anything more than playing with the colour blue? When it comes to children’s artwork, it ultimately doesn’t matter. Children’s creativity is more about the process of making it, than the final product. That squiggle in fact might be a car going fast. Kids aren’t professional artists and it doesn’t matter if the final piece is a masterpiece or not. What you want to encourage is the continued pleasure in making it, because with a little more practice they just might be.  my papa square

So how do you encourage your children to make art and show them that you care? A little conversation goes a long way. Try talking to your children about their art. Not only will this show your children that you care, but it gets them thinking about their artwork as well. If you are at a loss as to how to talk about the purple blot surrounded by brown lines, don’t worry. There is a story in that art, you just have to figure out how to find it.

 

Examples of Words of Encouragement

  • How did you make that shade of green?
  • Wow, you filled the entire page with your painting!
  • You’ve used lots of different lengths of lines in your picture.
  • That looks just like the flowers in our garden!
  • I think our trip to the fire station inspired this picture with all that red.
  • Why did you use those colours in your painting?
  • Where did you start drawing? Why?
  • What do you like best about your picture?
  • Which picture are you going to take off the bulletin board to make room for your new one?
  • Do you think Grandma would like this one for her fridge?
  • Tell me about your picture.

 

  • Point out their use of colour, space, lines, and/or other elements: Instead of asking your child what their art is or giving blanket praise to everything they create, comment on the elements within the art. Talk about what you see and recognize, like the colours, spaces between them, and the lines that bring them together. This shows that you are engaged and understand the process that your child has gone through.
  • Draw comparisons to life, the world, or other artists: Many artists try to recreate images in their artwork, for example in portraits, landscapes, still life’s and more. Draw comparisons between your child’s art and beyond. Point out similarities and see where the conversation leads.
  • Encourage critical thought: There is so much more to art than what you see on the page. What inspired your child’s artwork? What made them interpret it in the way they did? How can you get your child to talk more about the process they went through in making their art?
  • Offer pride of placement: Now that you have your child’s new art, what do you do with it? Here is another way that you can involve your child. Ask them where they would like to display their newest artwork. Would they like it on the fridge, bulletin board, on their bedroom door or wall? Remember that every new piece that gets displayed means that an old one gets taken down, so having them choose builds pride and ownership.
  • Don’t assume what it is: Talking about your child’s art is a wonderful way to have your child feel like you care about it, until you guess what the picture is and get it completely wrong. Children can quickly get discouraged, declare they are no good and give up on art altogether. What you think might be helpful guessing, could blow up in your face, so try not to always assume the topic of your child’s art. Instead, let them take the lead in explaining their art.

Drawing with Children

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Children equate art with drawing. Many base their art confidence on their ability to draw. It takes practice. So giving children the time, space and materials to practice is key in helping foster their confidence. Breaking it down in shapes is key.

Materials to start the process: pencils, good quality eraser, sharpener and a blank art book. 

Listed below are some websites and some of my favourite drawing books. Many of which can be found in your local library.  

Websites

Incredible [email protected] Lessons For older children

Art for Kids Hub Fantastic resource for how to draw and paint a variety of objects and characters  in video format

Hello Kids Video and Step by Step tutorial

Kids Front: For younger kids. Step by step with a click of a button.

Drawing How to Draw Video, Step by Step tutorial and written instructions.

Books

Ed Emberley. He has a series of books very popular with children.

1, 2,3 I Can Draw Kids Can Press

Step by Step Drawing Book by Usborne Books, Check out their many other titles.

My favourite is the Kids Can Draw series by Phillippe Legendre. Here are some samples from students.

animals1

Our NEWEST product is a 25 piece hardboard jigsaw puzzle. 17 x 17 cm $25. Till August 31, its on sale for $20 each. We currently have a limited number in stock. Email info(@)buddingartists.ca to order your personalized jigsaw puzzle.

lion puzzle

 

Summer Art Challenge 2016

Summer 2016 BA

Dad: Crayon Resist Project

June 8 is our deadline for a Father’s Day delivery.  Create a one of a kind gift using  a picture of Dad doing, saying and dreaming of his favourite activity. Choose from a pencil holder to a mug or a t-shirt to show off the artistic skills of your children.

Here’s a quick easy art project using a resist technique.FullSizeRender

Using a sharpie, draw block letters of a word. Have your child colour inside the letters in crayon or pastel.

Paint the the paper with watercolours, Et, voila une “masterpiece”! Another variation is to use bingo dabbers and contact paper. Cut out the letters and place upside down. This will be tricky since you have to make sure the letters and right side up. Your child will have a great time using the dabbers to dab all over their masterpiece.

 

Andy Warhol Style Family Portraits

Why not create an Andy Warhol portraits of your family?

IMG_8392 Many years ago, I came across Jessica Camis blog Art Smarts 4 Kids on creating Andy Warhol portraits of children. She recommends Photo to Sketch which I have to say is still the best program to use. I made minor changes when I created my son’s portrait. I used 30 precision but used 9 for line. I like seeing my lines thicker. I also put it through Photoshop just to clean up some of the lines. Here you can see the original and the cleaned up version.Untitled-2Aidan a 

We used liquid watercolours because I love them. You can use pencil crayons, markers or regular watercolours. Use 4 colours and alternate the colours between hair, face, background, shirt. My daughter left the neck, eyes and lips white. I tell children to begin with one colour. Colour in this order: face, hair, shirt, background .IMG_8385IMG_8387

Keep the images in order. Start with colour one and paint face of image one. Continue in order of face, hair, background, shirt. Take colour 2 and  paint image two’s face next and then hair of image 3,  background of image 4 and shirt of image 1 etc.

Then I scanned each one and made them into one image. If there are four people in your family, you can do a sketch of each person or you can create one with four people.

If you do create one, I would love to see it. Post it on our Facebook page.